Sarah Kay answers 13 questions in a Booker's Dozen.



TPQ: What are you currently reading?

SK: I'm currently reading Les Travaux, the 8-volume work on the drafting of the ECHR, for a huge paper I'm writing. I hope to soon have some time to read Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk, gifted to me by my friend and brilliant barrister Brenda.

TPQ: Best book you have ever read?

SK: The Ground Beneath Her Feet by Salman Rushdie. It's one of my favorite books of all time.

TPQ: A must-read before you die?

SK: I majored in classics in high school, so I think I did all the reading I needed to do, but maybe the must read before I die hasn't been written yet. I welcome suggestions.

TPQ: A preference for fact or fiction?

SK: I can't choose! I very rarely - and I mean it's happened once or twice during the last decade - fact because I want to keep reading about what I do and want to get better at it, but sometimes fiction provides the best escape.

TPQ: Favourite female author?

SK: I don't know if there is an author, male or female, whose books I would automatically buy if I knew they had one coming out. Marguerite Duras, probably.

TPQ: Favourite male author?

SK: I already cited Salman Rushdie, so I'm going to go with Philip K. Dick.


A Berlin Book Tower in memory of the Nazi book burning.

TPQ: First book you ever read?

SK: I literally don't have any idea. I remember I used to steal my older siblings' books, which was fine, because they didn't know I could read yet, so I could pretend it had nothing to do with me. But I don't remember. I might have also grabbed a book from my parents' library.

TPQ:
Favourite childhood author?

SK:
I was never into "child books", very early on. I would read a book if I wanted to read it. No one ever told me it was inappropriate or that I wouldn't understand. I have a lot of affection for The Giver by Lois Lowry, and for the values it holds.

TPQ: Any book you point blank refuse to read?

SK: Trump's books are a no-no.

TPQ: Any author you point blank refuse to read?

SK: Oh I also don't care about Sean Spicer's book. I heard John Yoo has one out as well? That's a shame.

TPQ: Pick a book to give to somebody so that they would more fully understand you.

SK: Circe by Madeline Miller. It was - again - gifted to me by a dear friend who understood that it would really help if I read something that wasn't law-related for once, and I was probably the last person on earth to read it since everyone around me was giving me rave reviews. Well, it didn't disappoint. I'm definitely a daughter of Circe.

TPQ: Last book you gave as a present?

SK:
I Am The Border, So I Am by @BorderIrish. I'm using it as stocking fillers this Christmas. Everyone needs to know. I think I also sent someone Ubik by Philip K. Dick.

TPQ:
Book you would most like to see turned into a movie?


SK: I'd rather they weren't. I think The Haunting of Hill House series was a masterpiece and really did the book justice. I'm also into The Man In The High Castle series, but they took liberties, so at first I was a little peeved. I don't know. I like books because they allow my imagination to form what it is and what it looks like; I don't want a vision to be imposed on me necessarily.

Sarah Kay is a human rights lawyer.

Booker’s Dozen @ Sarah Kay

Sarah Kay answers 13 questions in a Booker's Dozen.



TPQ: What are you currently reading?

SK: I'm currently reading Les Travaux, the 8-volume work on the drafting of the ECHR, for a huge paper I'm writing. I hope to soon have some time to read Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tokarczuk, gifted to me by my friend and brilliant barrister Brenda.

TPQ: Best book you have ever read?

SK: The Ground Beneath Her Feet by Salman Rushdie. It's one of my favorite books of all time.

TPQ: A must-read before you die?

SK: I majored in classics in high school, so I think I did all the reading I needed to do, but maybe the must read before I die hasn't been written yet. I welcome suggestions.

TPQ: A preference for fact or fiction?

SK: I can't choose! I very rarely - and I mean it's happened once or twice during the last decade - fact because I want to keep reading about what I do and want to get better at it, but sometimes fiction provides the best escape.

TPQ: Favourite female author?

SK: I don't know if there is an author, male or female, whose books I would automatically buy if I knew they had one coming out. Marguerite Duras, probably.

TPQ: Favourite male author?

SK: I already cited Salman Rushdie, so I'm going to go with Philip K. Dick.


A Berlin Book Tower in memory of the Nazi book burning.

TPQ: First book you ever read?

SK: I literally don't have any idea. I remember I used to steal my older siblings' books, which was fine, because they didn't know I could read yet, so I could pretend it had nothing to do with me. But I don't remember. I might have also grabbed a book from my parents' library.

TPQ:
Favourite childhood author?

SK:
I was never into "child books", very early on. I would read a book if I wanted to read it. No one ever told me it was inappropriate or that I wouldn't understand. I have a lot of affection for The Giver by Lois Lowry, and for the values it holds.

TPQ: Any book you point blank refuse to read?

SK: Trump's books are a no-no.

TPQ: Any author you point blank refuse to read?

SK: Oh I also don't care about Sean Spicer's book. I heard John Yoo has one out as well? That's a shame.

TPQ: Pick a book to give to somebody so that they would more fully understand you.

SK: Circe by Madeline Miller. It was - again - gifted to me by a dear friend who understood that it would really help if I read something that wasn't law-related for once, and I was probably the last person on earth to read it since everyone around me was giving me rave reviews. Well, it didn't disappoint. I'm definitely a daughter of Circe.

TPQ: Last book you gave as a present?

SK:
I Am The Border, So I Am by @BorderIrish. I'm using it as stocking fillers this Christmas. Everyone needs to know. I think I also sent someone Ubik by Philip K. Dick.

TPQ:
Book you would most like to see turned into a movie?


SK: I'd rather they weren't. I think The Haunting of Hill House series was a masterpiece and really did the book justice. I'm also into The Man In The High Castle series, but they took liberties, so at first I was a little peeved. I don't know. I like books because they allow my imagination to form what it is and what it looks like; I don't want a vision to be imposed on me necessarily.

Sarah Kay is a human rights lawyer.

1 comment:

  1. Sarah - that is a whole new world - haven't read any of them. Thanks as always for your input here

    ReplyDelete