Christopher Owens 🎵 with the 41st in his Predominance series.  

“I went out last Friday night. I got myself in a big street fight/Everybody's gettin' booked including me ‘cause there wasn't one hood that could see/We was wearin' sunglasses after dark.” ♫ Whitey Pullen

Horns up 

New Horizons 

 

SCXLVR – s/t


A side project for members of Pound Land, Fuck Fuck and Tiny Mortal which allows them the chance to channel their Autechre fixation, this release blends everything from exotica, IDM and dub into its sound, creating music of a fractured nature which can also be quite pretty in a misshapen way, such as track (Reddangel).

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Pocket Dimension – s/t

Described in the press release as “…a release that defies gravity and transcends boundaries…with atmospheric synths, creating a sonic tapestry that resonates with both mystery and intensity”, it’s not too dissimilar from the sound that Fuck Buttons created on ‘Tarot Sport’; a mix of tuneful melodies, driving beats and a layer of noise.

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Maquina – Prata

From Portugal, Maquina play the sort of music My Disco would make if they lived on downers. Down tuned, bass driven songs that take the drive of krautrock and the mechanical rhythms of industrial rock, they have made one of the grooviest albums of the year so far.

The album can be streamed and purchased here. 

Golden Oldies

 

The Cramps – Big Beat from Badsville


Although there’s no doubt that Lux and Ivy lost a certain ‘je ne sais quoi’ whenever they went from a two guitar/no bass band into a conventional beat combo, they still made fun and rocking records well worthy of your attention, as demonstrated by numbers like ‘Cramps Stomp’ and ‘Sheena’s in a Goth Gang’ which kick like a mule.


 

Brian Eno – Music for Airports


One of the first albums to be marketed as ambient, this gorgeously hypnotic LP is less about soundtracking life in an airport but more about tapping into the transcendental aspect of air travel while also providing a chilled out, ethereal backdrop to those waiting in a departure lounge. Easily dismissed by some as muzak, but those with a finely tuned ear will get it.


 

Death Grips – The Money Store


It’s hard to overstate the impact this album had upon its release. Blending hip hop, industrial, trap, rave, ragga and punk into a mass ball of incoherent (and yet, undeniably exciting) rage that influenced the likes of Kanye West and David Bowie. In particular, ‘System Blower’ and ‘Hustle Bones’ still make me feel I can punch glass and not feel a thing.


 

Martin Denny – Exotica


Although often dismissed as background music, exotica has proven to have had a durable influence on music through the use of sound effects, evocative melodies and off-kilter Latin rhythms. Although not the first exotica LP (which was ‘Ritual of the Savage’ by Les Baxter), this 1957 release gave the genre its name and visual aesthetics. Great music as well.



⏩ Christopher Owens was a reviewer for Metal Ireland and finds time to study the history and inherent contradictions of Ireland. He is currently the TPQ Friday columnist.

Predominance 41

Christopher Owens 🎵 with the 41st in his Predominance series.  

“I went out last Friday night. I got myself in a big street fight/Everybody's gettin' booked including me ‘cause there wasn't one hood that could see/We was wearin' sunglasses after dark.” ♫ Whitey Pullen

Horns up 

New Horizons 

 

SCXLVR – s/t


A side project for members of Pound Land, Fuck Fuck and Tiny Mortal which allows them the chance to channel their Autechre fixation, this release blends everything from exotica, IDM and dub into its sound, creating music of a fractured nature which can also be quite pretty in a misshapen way, such as track (Reddangel).

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Pocket Dimension – s/t

Described in the press release as “…a release that defies gravity and transcends boundaries…with atmospheric synths, creating a sonic tapestry that resonates with both mystery and intensity”, it’s not too dissimilar from the sound that Fuck Buttons created on ‘Tarot Sport’; a mix of tuneful melodies, driving beats and a layer of noise.

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Maquina – Prata

From Portugal, Maquina play the sort of music My Disco would make if they lived on downers. Down tuned, bass driven songs that take the drive of krautrock and the mechanical rhythms of industrial rock, they have made one of the grooviest albums of the year so far.

The album can be streamed and purchased here. 

Golden Oldies

 

The Cramps – Big Beat from Badsville


Although there’s no doubt that Lux and Ivy lost a certain ‘je ne sais quoi’ whenever they went from a two guitar/no bass band into a conventional beat combo, they still made fun and rocking records well worthy of your attention, as demonstrated by numbers like ‘Cramps Stomp’ and ‘Sheena’s in a Goth Gang’ which kick like a mule.


 

Brian Eno – Music for Airports


One of the first albums to be marketed as ambient, this gorgeously hypnotic LP is less about soundtracking life in an airport but more about tapping into the transcendental aspect of air travel while also providing a chilled out, ethereal backdrop to those waiting in a departure lounge. Easily dismissed by some as muzak, but those with a finely tuned ear will get it.


 

Death Grips – The Money Store


It’s hard to overstate the impact this album had upon its release. Blending hip hop, industrial, trap, rave, ragga and punk into a mass ball of incoherent (and yet, undeniably exciting) rage that influenced the likes of Kanye West and David Bowie. In particular, ‘System Blower’ and ‘Hustle Bones’ still make me feel I can punch glass and not feel a thing.


 

Martin Denny – Exotica


Although often dismissed as background music, exotica has proven to have had a durable influence on music through the use of sound effects, evocative melodies and off-kilter Latin rhythms. Although not the first exotica LP (which was ‘Ritual of the Savage’ by Les Baxter), this 1957 release gave the genre its name and visual aesthetics. Great music as well.



⏩ Christopher Owens was a reviewer for Metal Ireland and finds time to study the history and inherent contradictions of Ireland. He is currently the TPQ Friday columnist.

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