Christopher Owens 🎵 with the 23rd in his Predominance series.

“Yes, that's the difference between you/You'll let a leering scumbag beer drinking rat raise your nostrils for a close-up smell of fingertip nicotine and animal fat/And force an open dead mouth…” - Whitehouse

Horns Up

New Horizons 


Girls in Synthesis – The Rest is Distraction

This second full length from the London trio is a glorious post-punk sturm unt drahng which drives forward with an intensity not found in most modern acts of this ilk (listen to ‘How Your Prayers Have Changed’ for one example). But there still room for moments like ‘My Husband’ which are infused with a quirkiness that demonstrates that G.I.S know the score when it comes to post-punk.

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

R.A.M.B.O – Defy Extinction

From Philadelphia (a hotbed for hardcore and metal), R.A.M.B.O (an anacronym covering a variety of phrases) have been in hibernation for nearly 20 years. It seems the rest did them the world of good as this is a beefy, frantic hardcore album that takes aim at climate change deniers, organised religion, Trump supporters and incels. One to play when chucking a petrol bomb during a riot.

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Carla dal Forno – Come Around

For her fourth record, the Australian musician gives us more of her ethereal tinged post-punk which is always a joy to hear, especially around this time of the year. The title track invokes the feeling of standing in a seaside town in winter and reminiscing about summer, while album closer ‘Caution’ manages to add in a little tinge of industrial and pop to her lullaby.

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Poundland – Defeated

2022 has been a great year for misanthropic artists, due to the never ending well of inspiration that can be drawn from the modern world. And, having already releasing one immense tape this year, Poundland prove this by adding sludge and blues into the mix as well as lyrics that combine both the mundane and surreal. Two excellent releases from Stockport’s finest this year. Vive le Poundland!

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Golden Oldies 


Dr. Feelgood – Down by the Jetty


The recent death of Wilko Johnson at the age of 75 is a cruel reminder of the passage of time. Although his recorded output with Dr. Feelgood was limited to three studio albums and a live record, no one can deny the impact these records had on the British music scene at the time. More importantly, they still sound fresh and exuberant today. Wilko on guitar and Lee Brilleaux’s vocals were made for each other and, in some regards, were never the same once Wilko left.



Coil – The Ape of Naples

Pieced together by Peter ‘Sleazy’ Christopherson following the death of co-founder Jhonn Balance in November 2004, this is an astonishing (and deeply moving) record which is infused with grief. Opener ‘Fire of the Mind’ is a funeral march. ‘The Last Amethyst Deceiver’ is the soundtrack to the post funeral silence where old memories flood the mind in arbitrary fashion and closer ‘Going Up’ (which started life as a cover of the ‘Are You Being Served’ theme) is the ascent to a new world.


Hawkwind – Warrior on the Edge of Time

One of the seminal British underground groups, Hawkwind remain an endearing favourite on the live circuit. This, the last album with Lemmy Kilmister on bass, is not held in as high regard as earlier works but it is probably the closest to krautrock terrain with tracks like ‘Opa-Loka’ and ‘Dying Seas (penned by the recently deceased Nik Turner). Because of that, and lyrics based on works by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Percy Shelly and Michael Moorcock, it remains the one I return to the most.


Jah Wobble and Keith Levine – Yin and Yang

When his death was announced a few weeks ago, commentators (quite rightly) highlighted Keith Levine’s work with Public Image Ltd as creating the template for post-punk and influencing everyone from Killing Joke to U2. However, recent work (such as this collaboration with former PiL bassist Jah Wobble) demonstrated that his creativity and freshness was still to be marvelled. Wobble is also in fine form here, with plenty of throbbing basslines and hard hitting beats.


⏩ Christopher Owens was a reviewer for Metal Ireland and finds time to study the history and inherent contradictions of Ireland. He is currently the TPQ Friday columnist.

Predominance 23

Christopher Owens 🎵 with the 23rd in his Predominance series.

“Yes, that's the difference between you/You'll let a leering scumbag beer drinking rat raise your nostrils for a close-up smell of fingertip nicotine and animal fat/And force an open dead mouth…” - Whitehouse

Horns Up

New Horizons 


Girls in Synthesis – The Rest is Distraction

This second full length from the London trio is a glorious post-punk sturm unt drahng which drives forward with an intensity not found in most modern acts of this ilk (listen to ‘How Your Prayers Have Changed’ for one example). But there still room for moments like ‘My Husband’ which are infused with a quirkiness that demonstrates that G.I.S know the score when it comes to post-punk.

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

R.A.M.B.O – Defy Extinction

From Philadelphia (a hotbed for hardcore and metal), R.A.M.B.O (an anacronym covering a variety of phrases) have been in hibernation for nearly 20 years. It seems the rest did them the world of good as this is a beefy, frantic hardcore album that takes aim at climate change deniers, organised religion, Trump supporters and incels. One to play when chucking a petrol bomb during a riot.

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Carla dal Forno – Come Around

For her fourth record, the Australian musician gives us more of her ethereal tinged post-punk which is always a joy to hear, especially around this time of the year. The title track invokes the feeling of standing in a seaside town in winter and reminiscing about summer, while album closer ‘Caution’ manages to add in a little tinge of industrial and pop to her lullaby.

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Poundland – Defeated

2022 has been a great year for misanthropic artists, due to the never ending well of inspiration that can be drawn from the modern world. And, having already releasing one immense tape this year, Poundland prove this by adding sludge and blues into the mix as well as lyrics that combine both the mundane and surreal. Two excellent releases from Stockport’s finest this year. Vive le Poundland!

The album can be streamed and purchased here.

Golden Oldies 


Dr. Feelgood – Down by the Jetty


The recent death of Wilko Johnson at the age of 75 is a cruel reminder of the passage of time. Although his recorded output with Dr. Feelgood was limited to three studio albums and a live record, no one can deny the impact these records had on the British music scene at the time. More importantly, they still sound fresh and exuberant today. Wilko on guitar and Lee Brilleaux’s vocals were made for each other and, in some regards, were never the same once Wilko left.



Coil – The Ape of Naples

Pieced together by Peter ‘Sleazy’ Christopherson following the death of co-founder Jhonn Balance in November 2004, this is an astonishing (and deeply moving) record which is infused with grief. Opener ‘Fire of the Mind’ is a funeral march. ‘The Last Amethyst Deceiver’ is the soundtrack to the post funeral silence where old memories flood the mind in arbitrary fashion and closer ‘Going Up’ (which started life as a cover of the ‘Are You Being Served’ theme) is the ascent to a new world.


Hawkwind – Warrior on the Edge of Time

One of the seminal British underground groups, Hawkwind remain an endearing favourite on the live circuit. This, the last album with Lemmy Kilmister on bass, is not held in as high regard as earlier works but it is probably the closest to krautrock terrain with tracks like ‘Opa-Loka’ and ‘Dying Seas (penned by the recently deceased Nik Turner). Because of that, and lyrics based on works by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Percy Shelly and Michael Moorcock, it remains the one I return to the most.


Jah Wobble and Keith Levine – Yin and Yang

When his death was announced a few weeks ago, commentators (quite rightly) highlighted Keith Levine’s work with Public Image Ltd as creating the template for post-punk and influencing everyone from Killing Joke to U2. However, recent work (such as this collaboration with former PiL bassist Jah Wobble) demonstrated that his creativity and freshness was still to be marvelled. Wobble is also in fine form here, with plenty of throbbing basslines and hard hitting beats.


⏩ Christopher Owens was a reviewer for Metal Ireland and finds time to study the history and inherent contradictions of Ireland. He is currently the TPQ Friday columnist.

6 comments:

  1. Why did Wilko Leave Christopher? He seemed such a central part of the group, even more so than the lead vocalist. For me he was the raging energy within the band. Like Angus Young, he created his own inimitable guitar style and stage personality.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He left in 1977, not long after the 'Sneakin' Suspicion' LP came out.

      It was amusing to see Radio 2 play 'Milk & Alcohol' as a tribute to him, considering he was out of the group 2 years when it was recorded!

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    2. what caused him to leave?

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    3. Just read up on it - he said he was booted out and they said he left of his own accord.

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    4. Wilko was a speed freak and the rest of the band were drinkers. That chemical imbalance led to personality conflicts (speed freaks are often cantankerous bastards). Coupled with the pressure to come up with new songs and a disastrous tour of America supporting Kiss, it was never going to end well.

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    5. Probably a case where he jumped before he was pushed, but felt he was pushed regardless.

      A legend but I must admit that I lost respect for him due to him dismissing what Dr. Feelgood did after he left, right up to his death. I'm sure it didn't help that their biggest commercial success was without him but, considering Lee would go out of his way to avoid having a pop at him, Wilko did come across as petty. Maybe part of that is also because him and Lee never reconciled, and he regretted that.

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