Alex McCrory  with some observations on the outcome of the North's Stormont Assembly election.

Sinn Fein achieved an historical victory at the polls yesterday. I say this even though I did not vote myself. Being a keen student of Irish history, I recognise the significance of their triumph whilst also being conscious of its obvious limitations when viewed in the context of the Good Friday Agreement.

Yesterday's result is not a flash in the pan. On the contrary, it is the beginning of a new political order in the six-counties. Sinn Fein will consolidate it's position, leaving the SDLP adrift in a sea of uncertainty.

Really, it is difficult to see where the party of John Hume, hailed as the great peacemaker, goes from here. Perhaps a closer relationship with one of the southern parties, as suggested by some analysts, would anchor them in an all-island context. Quite clearly, it is past its sell by date as the party of northern nationalists. Sinn Fein has effectively stolen it's political attire and left it naked.

As for the DUP, it is hoist on it's own petard. By elevating the Protocol to a principle, it committed an act of political suicide, which was compounded by the refusal to accept a potential Sinn Fein first minister. Such undisguised arrogance infuriated nationalists and drove them into the arms of Sinn Fein. Whoever came up with this cunning electoral strategy needs shot at dawn.

What we are looking at is a lengthy period of Sinn Fein dominance in a British assembly. A party that once had 'Smash Stormont' as a primary political demand, now seeks to manifest it's position by restoring devolution. Of course, they will say it's not the same Stormont. 

Blah, blah, blah.

Alec McCrory 
is a former blanketman.

Sinn Fein Dominance In A British Assembly

Alex McCrory  with some observations on the outcome of the North's Stormont Assembly election.

Sinn Fein achieved an historical victory at the polls yesterday. I say this even though I did not vote myself. Being a keen student of Irish history, I recognise the significance of their triumph whilst also being conscious of its obvious limitations when viewed in the context of the Good Friday Agreement.

Yesterday's result is not a flash in the pan. On the contrary, it is the beginning of a new political order in the six-counties. Sinn Fein will consolidate it's position, leaving the SDLP adrift in a sea of uncertainty.

Really, it is difficult to see where the party of John Hume, hailed as the great peacemaker, goes from here. Perhaps a closer relationship with one of the southern parties, as suggested by some analysts, would anchor them in an all-island context. Quite clearly, it is past its sell by date as the party of northern nationalists. Sinn Fein has effectively stolen it's political attire and left it naked.

As for the DUP, it is hoist on it's own petard. By elevating the Protocol to a principle, it committed an act of political suicide, which was compounded by the refusal to accept a potential Sinn Fein first minister. Such undisguised arrogance infuriated nationalists and drove them into the arms of Sinn Fein. Whoever came up with this cunning electoral strategy needs shot at dawn.

What we are looking at is a lengthy period of Sinn Fein dominance in a British assembly. A party that once had 'Smash Stormont' as a primary political demand, now seeks to manifest it's position by restoring devolution. Of course, they will say it's not the same Stormont. 

Blah, blah, blah.

Alec McCrory 
is a former blanketman.

2 comments:

  1. Irrespective of Sinn Feins dilution of republicanism, which is plain to see, the DUP, or perhaps UDUP (Undemocratic Unionist Party) are refusing to nominate a Deputy First Minister. They are using the protocol as an excuse for this, instead of accepting they lost. If it was not the protocol it would be someother bolloxks of an excuse. Brandon Lewis is unofficially backing his right-wing allies in the six counties, and any form of republicanism will not do for the DUP. A"Protestant Parliament for a Protestant People" is what the DUP want, like the days of yore.

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  2. It is pretty much the outplaying of the internal solution that is the GFA. Unity only by consent of a majority in the North is the house rule which they have all agreed to play by. It was always the British state position and remains no different today. An important psychological win for nationalism but it is something that is sealed from the constitutional question. Unionism is damaged but not the union perhaps approximates closely to the state of play.

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